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Click to Expand/Collapse OptionEtymArab
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ʔarz أَرْز
ID ... • Sw – • BP ... • APD ... • Aut SG
ʔRZ
n.coll. (n.u. ‑aẗ )
cedar – WehrCowan1979.
From WSem *ʔarz‑ ‘cedar, pine’.
...
DRS 1 (1994)#ʔRZ–1 Ug ʔarz (Tropper2008: */ʔarzu/), Hbr ʔäräz , EmpAram ʔrz , JP Syr ʔarzā , Mand arza , nAram arra , Ar ʔarz , Soq ʔarz , Gz Te ʔarz ‘cèdre’.
▪ While Tropper2008, Huehnergard2011, and Kogan2011 only go back to the WSem level (reconstr. WSem *ʔarz‑ ‘cedar, pine’), DRS 1 (1994)#ʔRZ-1 reconstructs Sem *ʔarz‑ ‘cedar’, which, however, is said to be of unknown origin.
▪ According to DRS 1 (1994)#ʔRZ-1, the Ar and EthSem forms are borrowings from NSem.
▪ Lokotsch1927: Ar ʔarzaẗ ‘cedar, pinus cedrus’ > (+ def.art. al‑ ) > Span alerce ‘larch’, Sic arzanu ‘fir tree’. The author also thinks there is conspicuous similarity between Ar (al-)ʔarz and Lat larix , laric‑ , which gave Ital larice , Portug larico , Ge Lärche 1 ‘larch’. In contrast, Kluge2002 does not mention a possible relation betw Lat larix , laric‑ and Ar ʔarz but says the word is of unknown origin. EtymOnline says that Engl larch (1540s) is borrowed from Ge Lärche , via mHGe and oHGe (as in Kluge2002) from Lat larix , laric‑ , the latter however not from Ar, but probably a loan-word from an Alpine Gaulish lang, corresponding phonetically to oCelt *darik‑ ‘oak’ (cf. Druid and tree ).2
▪ Engl cedar, oEngl ceder , is definitely not from Ar ʔarz. In mEngl, ceder blended with oFr cedre , both from Lat cedrus , from Grk kédros ‘cedar, juniper’, origin uncertain. – EtymOnline.
1. Kluge2002: Ge Lärche , mHGe lerche , larche , oHGe lerihha . 2. Following these lines in EtymOnline we find: Engl druid , 1560s, from Fr druide , from Lat druidae (pl.), from Gaul Druides , from Celt compound *dru-wid‑ , probably representing oCelt *derwos ‘true’/pIE *dru‑ ‘tree’ (especially oak; see tree ) + *wid‑ ‘to know’. Hence, literally, perhaps, ‘they who know the oak’ (perhaps in allusion to divination from mistletoe). AnglSax, too, used identical words to mean ‘tree’ and ‘truth’ (treow ). – Engl tree , oEngl treo , treow ‘tree’ (also ‘timber, wood, beam, log, stake’), from pGerm *treuwaz‑ , from pIE *drew-o‑ , from *deru‑ ‘oak’ (Skr dru ‘tree, wood’, daru ‘wood, log’; Grk drŷs ‘oak’, drȳmós ‘copse, thicket’, dóry ‘beam, shaft of a spear’, oChSlav drievo , Ru derevo ‘tree, wood’; Alb drusk ‘oak’). This is from pIE *drew-o‑ , a suffixed form of the root *deru‑ ‘to be firm, solid, steadfast’ (see true ), with specialized sense ‘wood, tree’ and derivatives referring to objects made of wood. – The widespread use of words originally meaning ‘oak’ in the sense ‘tree’ probably reflects the importance of the oak to ancient Indo-Europeans. In oEngl and mEngl also ‘thing made of wood’, especially the cross of the Crucifixion and a gallows (such as Tyburn tree , famous gallows outside London). mEngl also had pl. treen , adj. treen (oEngl treowen ‘of a tree, wooden’).
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